Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

The first post-2015 negotiations: stocktaking

February 3, 2015

The first intergovernmental negotiations (IGN) took place on 19 – 21 January 2015, signalling the beginning of the final phase of the post-2015 process. The Irish and Kenyan co-facilitators have released an indicative roadmap which outlines a clear agenda until May, after which there are three final sessions to address outstanding issues. (more…)

Updated UN Post-2015 roadmap

January 19, 2015

As a tool to help stakeholders engage with the UN this year, we’ve pulled together an overview of the Financing for Development (FFD), post-2015 and UNFCCC (UN Framework Convention on Climate Change) processes this year. It also includes other key moments such as the President of the General Assembly’s High Level Events and the meeting of the High Level Political Forum (HLPF).

CAFODPost2015roadmapv5

It doesn’t include other important moments such as the 59th meeting of the Commission on the Status of Women, which takes place from 9 – 20 March, and marks the 20th anniversary of Beijing. March also hosts the 3rd WCDRR in Sendai, which some are treating as the canary in the mine for other UN processes which follow later in the year.

Please get in touch if you see any info which is missing or inaccurate. Here’s to 2015 delivering on all fronts!

Climate talks in Lima: money talks

December 5, 2014

As the fifth day of the Lima climate talks get underway the role of climate finance is again emerging as a crucial issue. Recent announcement by developing countries about financial contributions to the initial capitalisation Green Climate Fund – including the UK’s commitment to provide £720 million – has gone a long way in showing willing, but the lack of space for discussion on finance at the COP in Lima is putting that at risk.

The discussion on ‘INDCs’ or intended nationally determined contributions – each country’s individual plan for tackling climate change – are taking centre stage in Lima. There is much work to be done amongst parties to establish what exactly should be contained in the INDCs and how those elements included could be comparable so a clear idea of ambitious could be established ahead of Paris. 

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Reading UNSG’s post-2015 synthesis report: ‘The Road to Dignity by 2030′

December 4, 2014

Today saw the publication of the UN Secretary General’s long-awaited synthesis report on the post-2015 development agenda. Here’s a quick analysis from CAFOD’s point of view, remembering that the report has to tread a fine political line between many different priorities.

The Secretary General delivers a positive input to the post-2015 process

The Secretary General delivers a positive input to the post-2015 process

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Thoughts on the UN SG’s post-2015 synthesis report

December 2, 2014

The next stepping stone in the post-2015 process is the long-anticipated Synthesis Report from the UN Secretary General due out as an advanced unedited copy on Thursday 4th December. This report will draw on multiple inputs, such as the Open Working Group (OWG) proposal for Sustainable Development Goals, the UN High Level Panel report from 2013 and the report on financing sustainable development also from last year, as well as many more letters, position papers and petitions from across civil society and other stakeholders. Bringing together these diverse strands is obviously a difficult task and getting the right balance between these different pieces will require great diplomatic skill.

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DFID’s approach to economic development: answering David Kennedy’s call to engage

November 27, 2014

On Monday I was the lucky recipient of a last-minute ticket to the PWC International Development Conference when a colleague wasn’t able to attend any more. David Kennedy, the newly appointed Economic Development Director General, gave an impressive-20-minute-no-notes opening address focussing on DFIDs approach to economic development.

David Kennedy speech

David Kennedy speaking at the PWC International Development Conference, 24 November 2014. Source: twitter

He emphasised throughout that DFID are still developing much of their thinking and that they would welcome discussion on this. He ended by saying, “if you have any other questions or thoughts, send me an email, I’d love to engage” – and so, taking this offer at face value, here are my three points:

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What is the social impact of the World Bank’s support to regulatory reform? Don’t ask the Bank

November 25, 2014

The World Bank Group’s Independent Evaluation Group highlights that the Bank’s support to business regulation reforms fails to capture the social impact of regulatory reform. In this blog, first published by the Bretton Woods Project we look at this critique in more detail.

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Post-2015: how many goals is too many?

July 31, 2014

When Moses came down the mountain, he had ten commandments. Unfortunately, there is no such clarity within the post-2015 process on how many goals are the right number for a new global development framework.

Charlton Heston as Moses

Charlton Heston as Moses

The MDGs had 8. Although few people apart from real development policy wonks can remember every goal, the international community is now trying to reach consensus on what the upper limit is for a framework that is both concise and communicable. Is it 10 or 12? Could it even be 17?

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Low carbon credit where low carbon credit is due

July 24, 2014

By Rob Elsworth, Climate and Energy Analyst, CAFOD

The Government has announced that the UK’s fourth carbon budget will not be revised. This means that the legally binding target of a 50% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions for the period 2023-2027 against 1990 levels will be required.

The Government has made the right decision, for which they should be commended.

From a CAFOD perspective, the Government’s decision sends a hugely important message of encouragement to governments and civil society around the world about shifting towards more sustainable development. CAFOD’s work with partners on moving towards a more sustainable future is strengthened tremendously by the UK’s own commitment to a low carbon future.

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Is access to justice for poor communities really so risky for British business interests?

April 8, 2014

justiceimagesIn 2011 and 2012 the UK Government submitted official briefings to the US Supreme Court in relation to two high profile legal cases alleging corporate involvement in grave human rights abuses in the Niger Delta and Papua New Guinea.

These briefings questioned the right of the affected communities to use the US Courts to bring cases against Shell and Rio Tinto respectively. On 7 April the Guardian reported on the backstory to this decision, including the links between Shell and Rio Tinto and the Foreign Office’s official intervention in relation to these US Court cases.

The article is based on documents drawn from the CORE corporate responsibility coalition’s freedom of information requests. http://www.amnesty.org.uk/sites/default/files/fs50487115_croser_kiobel_-_full_documents_following_ico_decision.pdf

They raise key questions about how and why the Government chose to prioritize what it saw as business interests in the Kiobel v Royal Dutch Petroleum & Shell case.  (more…)


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